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Eivind (like the Terrible)

3ivin6@books.babb.no

Joined 5 months, 1 week ago

I like big books and I cannot lie

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Eivind (like the Terrible)'s books

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2024 Reading Goal

51% complete! Eivind (like the Terrible) has read 51 of 100 books.

Caroline Dodds Pennock: On Savage Shores (EBook, 2023, Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 4 stars

In this groundbreaking new history, Caroline Dodds Pennock recovers the long-marginalised stories of the Indigenous …

Among the ‘chiefest Rarities’ of the collection held in the Public Theatre and Anatomie Hall of the University of Leiden were: ‘a Norway house built of beams without mortar or stone; shoes and sandals from Russia, Siam and Egypt; the skin of a man dressed as parchment; a drinking cup made out of the skull of a Moor killed in the beleaguering of Haarlem; warlike arms used in China; Chinese gongs, paper and books; Egyptian mummies and idols; a petrified toadstool; and a mallet or hammer that the savages in New York kill with’. These collections or ‘wunderkammer’ (usually translated as ‘cabinet of curiosities’, but literally a ‘wonder chamber’) would, to a modern observer used to the order of museums and galleries, seem like an incoherent jumble, but in the early modern mind they formed a coherent whole.

On Savage Shores by 

Caroline Dodds Pennock: On Savage Shores (EBook, 2023, Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 4 stars

In this groundbreaking new history, Caroline Dodds Pennock recovers the long-marginalised stories of the Indigenous …

This revulsion at the inequality of European society was a common response among Indigenous travellers whose voices emerge in later years, particularly those from outside the major urban centres of Mexico and Peru. What little evidence we have suggests that earlier voyagers would have shared this response, seeing the contrast between the endemic poverty of the cities and the luxury of the royal court. A Wyandot youth named Savignon, brought to France by the navigator Samuel de Champlain in 1610, was shocked that some people had to beg for charity in Europe just to eat, as well as by the violence meted out in the name of justice and parenting.

On Savage Shores by 

Jules Verne: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Extraordinary Voyages, #6) (2002) 5 stars

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas (French: Vingt mille lieues sous les mers) is a …

As you know, at the turn of the tide, the waters confined between the Faroe and Lofoten Islands rush out with irresistible violence. They form a vortex from which no ship has ever been able to escape. Monstrous waves race together from every point of the horizon. They form a whirlpool aptly called “the ocean’s navel,” whose attracting power extends a distance of fifteen kilometers. It can suck down not only ships but whales, and even polar bears from the northernmost regions.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Extraordinary Voyages, #6) by 

Caroline Dodds Pennock: On Savage Shores (EBook, 2023, Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 4 stars

In this groundbreaking new history, Caroline Dodds Pennock recovers the long-marginalised stories of the Indigenous …

The idea of the Europeans as ‘white gods’ is a famous story, but it tends to appear only in retrospective sources looking back on events. It is a fabulously elaborated myth, which may well have been created by Indigenous people trying to understand their devastating losses (who could stand up against a divine invasion?) and it also suited the Europeans’ superiority complex quite beautifully, so I am deeply suspicious of claims that Columbus’s interpreters ran from house to house in every community crying ‘Come, and see the people from heaven!’ Of course, they may have done so – perhaps they wanted to please their captors, or perhaps Columbus misunderstood the meaning of their words – but that doesn’t necessarily mean they believed the Europeans were divine. Even if such a belief existed in those first confusing days, it could not have lasted. It’s hard to imagine the Taínos could believe the Europeans to be anything other than men, after several months spent with them, sharing the indignities of shipboard life. And yet the ‘white gods myth’ pops up constantly in accounts of colonial encounter.

On Savage Shores by 

Jules Verne: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Extraordinary Voyages, #6) (2002) 5 stars

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas (French: Vingt mille lieues sous les mers) is a …

Leaving Old Bahama Channel, which is fourteen leagues wide by 350 meters deep, the Gulf Stream moves at the rate of eight kilometers per hour. Its speed steadily decreases as it advances northward, and we must pray that this steadiness continues, because, as experts agree, if its speed and direction were to change, the climates of Europe would undergo disturbances whose consequences are incalculable.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Extraordinary Voyages, #6) by